News

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  • UMI Terahertz technique used on 17th century art is in the news

    UMI Terahertz characterization technique for artwork recognized by CNRS.

  • Prof. Abdallah Ougazzaden honored

    Nomination of Prof. Abdallah Ougazzaden nominated to the National Academy of Metz

  • Imaging Technique Unlocks the Secrets of 17th Century Artists

    The secrets of 17th century artists can now be revealed, thanks to 21st century signal processing.

    The secrets of 17th century artists can now be revealed, thanks to 21st century signal processing. Using modern high-speed scanners and the advanced signal processing techniques, researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology are peering through layers of pigment to see how painters prepared their canvasses, applied undercoats, and built up layer upon layer of paint to produce their masterpieces.

  • Transfer Technique Produces Wearable Gallium Nitride Gas Sensors

    A new technique allows gallium nitride gas sensors to be grown on a standard substrate and then transferred to a different support.

    A transfer technique based on thin sacrificial layers of boron nitride could allow high-performance gallium nitride gas sensors to be grown on sapphire substrates and then transferred to metallic or flexible polymer support materials. The technique could facilitate the production of low-cost wearable, mobile and disposable sensing devices for a wide range of environmental applications.

  • Charles Munson wins first place at Trophée MC6

    Congratuations to Charles Munson on receiving the first place prize at Trophée MC6, a French scientific startup competition in which graduate student teams from the Grand Est region of France present their research in French within six minutes to an audie

  • PhD student Mahbub Alam wins award for his nanotechnology

    Mahbub Alam wins award for his nanotechnology

    Congratulations to PhD student Mahbub Alam, who was awarded to Incubic/ Milton Chang Travel Grant to present his work at Frontiers in Optics,  Rochester, New York, October 2016.  Mahbub's work shows the potential of new kinds of optoelectronic devices based on 2-D materials.  These devices result in photocurrents with a frequency dependent direction of travel. Mahbub completed his PhD in August 2016 under the supervision of Prof. Paul Voss.